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 NEARBY ATTRACTIONS

There are hundreds of places to visit within a short drive of the Park, and here we've listed a few of our favourites.
The list includes something for everybody: indoors and out, young and old. 
 
• Malham Cove
 
A natural limestone formation approximately one mile from the village of Malham, the Cove is a large, curved cliff at the head of the valley and a popular destination for tourists and locals alike.
 
Originally the site of a waterfall, caused by a melting glacier, Malham Cove now forms part of the Pennine Way and was used as a location for “Harry Potter and The Deadly Hallows (Part 1)”.
 
www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/visit-the-dales/discover-the-dales/limestone-features/malham-cove
 
 • Bronte Parsonage, Haworth
Home for all three famous literary daughters, the Parsonage is open daily throughout the summer and winter, only closing for a couple of days over the Christmas period. Offering a fascinating insight into their lives, the Parsonage is an essential stop for all fans of great British literature.
 

www.bronte.org.uk

 
• Top Withens / Wuthering Heights, Haworth
 
From a plaque which adorns the ruined farmhouse at Top Withens: “This farmhouse has been associated with "Wuthering Heights", the Earnshaw home in Emily Brontë's novel. The buildings, even when complete, bore no resemblance to the house she described, but the situation may have been in her mind when she wrote of the moorland setting of the Heights.”
 
Such is the popularity of Top Withens, that the footpath signs directing walkers are also written in Japanese.
Essential visiting if you’re a fan of the novel.
 
 
• The National Media Museum, Bradford
Home to in excess of 3.5 million items of historical significance, with galleries and interactive exhibits across eight floors. Also home to the UK's first IMAX cinema and a working BBC studio.
 
Admission is free, and the Museum is open every day except Monday.
 
 
• Five Rise Locks and St Ives, Bingley
 
A major feat of engineering when it opened in 1774, Five Rise Locks remains impressive even today. A ‘staircase’ of five locks for canal boats raises boats 59 feet over its distance and watching them in action regularly draws a crowd.
 
 
The nearby St Ives Estate is a 550 acre country park, listed as Grade II by the English Heritage National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Interest. Visited by some 300,000 people each year, St Ives is the perfect day out in tranquil surroundings.
 
 
• Keighley and Worth Valley Railway, Keighley
 
As featured in The Railway Children, The Keighley and Worth Valley railway evokes a bygone age of steam, with its 5 miles of track running from Keighley to Oxenhope. Built in 1867, the line closed in 1962 but was re-opened in 1968 by the preservation society which still owns it.
 
 
• The Cow and Calf, Ilkley
 
Part of the historic Ilkley Moors, inspiration for Yorkshire’s unofficial “national” anthem “On Ilka Moor Baht ‘at”, the Cow and Calf are a large rock formation consisting of an outcrop and boulder.
 
Offering fantastic views across the Wharfe Valley, the Cow and Calf is an extremely popular destination during summer months, with visitors from across the county to visit. Walkers often use it as a starting point for walking across the moors to Keighley.
 
 
• Piece Hall, Halifax
 
Located in the centre of Halifax town centre, Piece Hall was original constructed as a sales centre for the local weavers, opening in 1779 with more than 300 individual rooms arranged around a central courtyard.
 
Today Piece Hall is home to a wide range of shops, galleries and cafes; specialising in the obscure, the unusual and the quirky and most weekends during the summer live entertainment takes place in the courtyard.
 
 
• Skipton and Skipton Castle
 
Known as the Gateway to the Dales, Skipton is a historic market town which was listed in the Domesday Book of 1085. One end of its main street is dominated by Skipton Castle, first built in 1090 by Norman baron Robert de Romille.
 
A flourishing and colourful market takes place through the heart of the town every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.
 

www.skiptoncastle.co.uk

 
• Bolton Abbey, nr Ilkley and Skipton
 
Located in the ruined 12th century Augustinian Bolton Priory in North Yorkshire, Bolton Abbey is located on the banks of the River Wharfe. Partly in ruins, Bolton Abbey was never actually completed due to the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539. It remains however a beautiful building set in stunning surroundings.
 
 
• Saltaire, Salts Mill and 1853 Gallery, Saltaire, Bradford
 
Founded by Sir Titus Salt in 1851 as a model village for his workers, Saltaire is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and home of stunning Victorian architecture.
 
The former Mill is now an art gallery, shopping and restaurant complex, housing amongst other things a large collection by Bradford-born artist David Hockney.
 
The former Congregational church (now known as the United Reform Church) is itself Grade I listed, built by Sir Titus it is located within stunning landscaped gardens and overlooks the Leeds to Liverpool canal.
 
 
• Kirkstall Abbey and Abbey House, Leeds
 
A ruined Cistercian monastery on the outskirts of Leeds, Kirkstall Abbey was founded in 1152, and disestablished during the dissolution of the monasteries.
 
A Grade I listed building, the Abbey has undergone extensive renovation in recent years and has a visitor centre with interactive exhibits.
 
Entry is free of charge.
 

www.leeds.gov.uk/museumsandgalleries/Pages/Kirkstall-Abbey.aspx

 
Across the road from the Abbey itself, Abbey House contains a series of mocked-up Victorian streets, illustrating the wide range of shops with original fittings.
 
 
• Harewood House
 
Built between 1759 and 1771, Harewood House is home to both the Earl of Harewood and the set of soap opera Emmerdale.
 
A Grade I listed building, featuring furniture designed and built by Thomas Chippendale, the gardens designed by Capability Brown have a number of features which in their own right have Grade I, II and II* listings.
 
Whilst entry to Harewood is chargeable, a variety of special offers and family deals are in place, and a visit is truly a complete day out.
 
 
• The Royal Armouries, Leeds
 
Consisting of both traditional displays and live presentations, The Royal Armouries museum in Leeds contains six galleries, covering War, Peace, Hunting, Oriental, Tournament and Self Defence. 
 
The outdoor courtyards regularly displays of falconry and jousting, with a four day taking place from Good Friday to Easter  Monday.
 
Entry to the main museum is free, with some of the outdoor activities are chargeable.
 
 
• Hebden Bridge and Hardcastle Crags
 
Nestled just on the Yorkshire side of the Pennines, Hebden Bridge was historically a mill town, until the industry dwindled, leaving the town in a poor state.
 
Hebden Bridge's rejuvination began in the 70s, when the town became a popular home for an unlikely combination of artists, activists, musicians and alternative therapy practitioners, giving it an incredibly diverse cultural feeling for visitors and locals alike. 
 
Approximately two miles from the town centre lies Hardcastle Crags, a wooded valley and home of Gibson Mill. Originally water powered, the Mill has been renovated to demonstrate the potential of renewable energy.
  
  
• Holmfirth
 
There's much more to this town than being location for "Last of the Summer Wine", though for fans a visit to Sid's Cafe is essential.
 
Located in stunning surroundings, a few miles outside Huddersfield, Holmfirth is on the edge of the Peak District and home to a colourful array of art, craft, musical and theatrical events - especially during the summer months.
 
Every May, the town hosts its own folk festival, with every possible venue featuring some form of live music. Acts range from the famous to the unknown, and it's common to find impromptu gigs occurring around every corner.
 
 
• Eureka!: The National Children's Museum
 
An interactive, educational museum located a (very) short distance from Halifax train station; Eureka! focuses on learning through play. Whilst it's aimed at children upto 11, the grown-ups aren't forgotten, with parental involvement practically demanded.
 

 

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